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International Law in a Turbulent World
Course Description

Law is presented as applied by the international actors and tribunals, but appropriate attention will be devoted to critical thoughts which will repeatedly penetrate discussions. The reader reflects the diversity of international legal writing: it contains chapters from major textbooks, articles from leading journals and primary sources. 

The course is designed to develop the students’ readiness to elaborate logical arguments supporting a predetermined position, in other words, to represent a legal claim and the underlying interests/priorities with the help of a toolbox of available legal arguments. At the same time, they are encouraged to take stance and argue for their personal value preferences and critically assess the political in the normative. Seminar discussion helps refine the argumentative and rhetoric skills. The presentation by each student during the course serves to strengthen their research design capabilities, the skill of academic co-operation, and, at the same time, the readiness for individual work.

Learning Outcomes

The course is designed to develop the students’ readiness to elaborate logical arguments supporting a predetermined position, in other words, to represent a legal claim and the underlying interests/priorities with the help of a toolbox of available legal arguments. At the same time, they are encouraged to take stance and argue for their personal value preferences and critically assess the political in the normative. Seminar discussion helps refine the argumentative and rhetoric skills. The presentation by each student during the course serves to strengthen their research design capabilities, the skill of academic co-operation, and, at the same time, the readiness for individual work.

The final exam (whether a 24 hour long take home or an essay to be produced depending on the agreement among the participants) mobilizes the analytical and critical skills (and the ability to be productive in short time frames in case the 24 hours exam is chosen). Constant formal and informal comment from the professor during the course creates an iterative process leading to deeper insight. 

Assessment

Grading:  Participation and presentation(s): 25 %

Midterm test/continuous evaluation (to be decided by the group): 25 %

Final exam or essay  - to be decided: 50 % 

Prerequisites

No legal background (general, or in public international law) is required

File attachments
Course Level
Master’s
Academic Year
2023-2024
Term
Fall
US Credits
4
ECTS Credits
8
Course Code
INTR-5052